Bring Digital Citizenship agreements together

I had to link the digital citizenship agreements I have developed to create a continuum that starts in the junior school with our younger learners and proceeds through to our more senior students. I took the three agreements or guidelines and combined them into one document that follows three strands -

  • personal responsibility,
  • social responsibility and
  • material responsibility

At each grouping the language is different and age appropriate but the underlying contexts of protecting and respecting are there. I do not see any value in having new entrant and very young primary/elementary students signing any document as they will not understand that expectations or in the case of the younger students even be able to read them. The originals are here at http://edorigami.wikispaces.com . Digital Citrizenship is a core element of the 21st Century Fluencies we have developed at the 21st Century fluency project

As always I wold appreciate your feedback and suggestions.

DC across the years

Updated JS Computer Use Guidelines

Thanks for the feedback and the comments – I have updated the JS guidelines and invite comments and suggestions.

JS internet-computer use guide

Computers at school

When we aren’t at school we use computers for lots of reasons. When we are at school, we use computers, ipads, ipods, the internet, printers or cell phones for our learning in class.

Using our Computers

We use our computers for learning. We do not play games without our teachers permission.

We will not download movies or videos, music or games without permission. This could be stealing. We will check with our teacher.

We will look after ourselves online.

Sometimes we see stuff that is rude, nasty, mean, dangerous or inappropriate, we must close down the application and tell the nearest teacher.

We will not put any personal information about ourselves on the internet. We won’t post photos or videos about ourselves. We will not share information like our address, phone numbers, hobbies or daily activities.

We will look after other people.

We will not share any personal information about other people over the internet. We won’t post other peoples photos, videos or share information.

When we write anything about a person we will asks “how would I feel if somebody said that about me?”. If it is mean or nasty, don’t say it.

We will look after ourselves and other people by telling our teachers or parents about people who are being mean or bullying.

Using other people’s stuff

We will acknowledge all stuff we use in doing our research from websites and include web addresses in our work.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Junior School Computer Use Guidelines

I am working on Junior School version of the digital citizenship materials. I would love comments and suggestions on this rework of some earlier stuff I put together.

Junior School Computer use Guidelines as a PDF JS internet-computer use guide (PDF)


Computers at school

We come to school to learn. Here at school, we have computers and the internet for our learning. We only use computers, ipads, ipod, the internet, printers or cell phones for our learning.

Using our Computers

We do not play games without our teachers permission.

Sometimes we see stuff that is rude, nasty, mean, dangerous or inappropriate, we must click on the HOME button immediately and tell their teacher.

We will not download movies, music, videos or games. This is stealing.

We will look after ourselves online.

We will not put any personal information about ourselves on the internet. We won’t post photos or videos about ourselves. We will not share information like their address, phone numbers, hobbies or daily activities.

We will look after other people.

We will not share any personal information about other people over the internet. We won’t post other peoples photos, videos or share information.

When we write anything about a person we will asks “how would I feel if somebody said that about me?”. If it is mean or nasty don’t say it.

We will look after ourselves and other people by telling their teachers or parents about people who are being mean or bullying.

Using other people’s stuff

We will acknowledge all stuff we use in doing our research from websites and include web addresses in our work.

Digital Citizenship for Junior Students

I have been working on Digital Citizenship guidelines for the younger students. In so many of the example of Acceptable use agreements we see online the language ised is considerably beyond the vocabulary and understanding of some of the younger students. I have also been trying to crystalise the “essence” of the agreement into a simple series of statements or guidelines.

At the Vision day last week in Whangarei, Morningside School shared with the workshop their school philosophy.

  • Be Safe
  • Be Kind
  • Be Sensible

I like these and they fit with each of the three aspects of digital citizenship we use for the middle school.

Here is the latest attempt – I have run it through the Lexile readability analyser  and SMOG tools

SMOG = 12.4

Lexile = 710L

Digital Citizenship Guidelines

Junior School

Looking after me.

  • I will only go on the computer when I have permission.

  • I will only go to pages I am allowed to go to.

  • I will only share pictures and stories about myself when my teacher tells me to.

  • I will talk to my parents and teacher about all of my online friends.

  • I will tell my teacher or parents if anyone is unkind to me on the computer.

Looking after others.

  • I will only say nice things about people.

  • I will ask before I share a picture or story about a person.

  • I will only go to places that are nice and I will tell my parents or teacher if I go to a place that is nasty, unkind or rude.

Looking after stuff.

  • I will not download movies, games or music.

  • I will check that the information I get on the web is correct.

  • I wont leave rude or unkind messages on other people spaces.

Acceptable use agreements in Junior School

Many, if not most schools have a policy where students of all ages are expected to sign an acceptable use agreement. Students from year 1 upwards are required to sign these agreements. The language used in the agreements is very rarely suitable for the younger students and they struggle to understand them, let alone read them or sign the document.

The problem with this is in my opinion two fold. First the students are so young that they are unable to comprehend what they are signing. The concepts that are detailed in the acceptable use agreements are beyond the experiences of the students. The students are essentially told to sign the agreement, and do not understand what they are signing. So what is the value of this?

The second problem is, in my opinion, that the parents are asked to sign that they accept the rules, and are never present to supervise the actions of their children or students. Further in the absence of parents, we are the teachers are parents in locum. So it comes back to us being responsible

So I have to question the value of these documents. So what is the alternative?

Well, I have talked about this with several colleagues, and I think the best alternative is actually what we operate with the digital citizens, partnership.

I think our agreement about acceptable use would involve all three aspects of the community, parents, teachers and students. The approach would start with a clear statement of what we, as a school can and can not do. This would include restrictions and monitoring, students education and training, and our expectations. It would also cover what we can’t do, like be watching every student every minute of the day, stop children from sneaking in and using computers or from opening multiple windows and applications and switching rapidly between them.

The second part would be what we expect from the parents and what we can do to support them in this. This would outline the expectations and suggestions for home computer access and use. It would also explain the cyber-safety evenings and parent support mechanisms.

The third part would cover the expectations, behaviors and outcomes from the students. It would cover the vision of the student as a digital citizen appropriate for the age of the child.

The document would then be signed by all three parties not as as legal agreement, more as a memorandum of understanding, understanding that this is a learning journey.

This would be a positive documents that models the partnerships that we need to develop to develop students who are ethical, moral contributors to our digital world.

Thoughts?

Digital Citizen – Junior School Guidelines

Friday I was working with the eWrapper ICT  PD Cluster down in Waiuku. The focus for the the principals and elearning staff was Digital Citizenship. It was a fun day and productive.

One of the issues we see all the time in primary, is students are asked to sign acceptable use agreements, along with their parents. The agreements are not written in any way shape or form for the students, many of which in year 1 struggle to write their own name, let alone read the complexity of an acceptable use agreement. The purpose of these agreements is, I believe, purely to add a layer of protection for the school, as its irrelevant and meaningless to the students. (if you think I am kidding do a search for “acceptable use agreements” and elementary or primary school)

So I though I would take some of the concepts in the acceptable use documents and then mould them into a form that the students atleast would understand when its read to them. Here is my attempt and I would appreciate feedback:

Junior School Computer Guidelines

The school provides computers and the internet for you to learn. All use of computers, printers, cell phones and the internet at school is only for your learning. Students should not play games without specific teacher permission.

If students accidentally see material that is rude, nasty, mean, dangerous or inappropriate, they must click on the HOME button immediately and tell their teacher.

Students will not download movies, videos or games. This is stealing.

Looking after themselves online. – Students will not put any personal information about themselves on the internet. They won’t post photos or videos about themselves or share information like their address, phone numbers, hobbies or daily activities.

Looking after other people. – Students will not share any personal information about other people over the internet. They won’t post other peoples photos, videos or share information. When they write anything they will asks “how would I feel if somebody said that about me?”. If it is mean or nasty don’t say it.

They will look after themselves and other people by telling their teachers or parents about people who are being mean or bullying.

Students will acknowledge all material taken from websites and include web addressees in their work.

Meet me at the Corner

Every now and then I will get some one who will contact me and ask to do a review of their site or push their product. For the most part I delete these. But Donna from Meet me at the corner asked me to do a review of her site. She introduced herself as a film maker and children’s Author.

Well I had a look at the site and I have to say I quite like it. It has a large number of videos hosted on it and these are of a good quality.

As they say on the blurb ” MEET ME AT THE CORNER, Virtual Field Trips for Kids takes you to meet fascinating people from all over the world. New educational, kid-friendly episodes are uploaded every two weeks. Included are links to fun websites and our Learning Corner with follow-up questions.

I like the fact that the video I watched had a young person, Chip, interviewing. This appears to be standard for each of the videos.

So would I recommend it – actually I would. I think this is a good site for Primary and Middle School students.

http://www.meetmeatthecorner.org/